Brompton

Posted on: March 21, 2018, by :

Brompton

Used to be a villages surrounded by market gardens. In the 1840s, together with other areas in west london, it underwent a period of development into residential and commercial areas. Brompton is better known for the two hospitals, the Royal Brompton and the Royal Marsden and the famous Brompton Cemetery.

Brompton Cemetery is considered an area of special historic interest. The cemetery is listed as Grade I in the Historic England’s register and is the only cemetery owned by the Crown and managed by the Royal Parks. It opened in 1840 and contains 35,000 monuments and gravestones, catacombs and a chapel in the middle. The cemetery is popular with wildlife and it is rumoured that Beatrix Potter who lived nearby used some of the names etched on the gravestones for the characters in her stories.

The cemetery is a popular location for film shoots. It was featured in Guy Ritchie’s Sherlock starring Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law. The mausoleum was Lord Blackwood’s tomb. It was also featured in Stormbreaker a teen spy movie starring Alex Pettyfer and Ewan McGregor and the site of a funny funeral sequence in the film Johnny English with Rowan Atkinson as the title character.

The Royal Brompton hospital was founded in the 1840s and was the main hospital dealing with tuberculosis or better known as consumption in the mid 19th century. Then, the cause and treatment of tuberculosis were not known and patients suffering from this illness was turned away. They were taken into the Royal Brompton. The hospital stone was laid by Prince Albert, the Prince Consort to Queen Victoria. It was a beautiful building in red brick with Portland stone moulding and had ventilation ducts where warm air is forced inside to emulate temperatures in warmer tropics. Today the hospital is known as the international lead in heart and lung diseases. It is also the centre for treatment and management of cystic fibrosis in Europe.

Founded in 1851 by William Marsden, the Royal Marsden hospital was founded as the Free Cancer Hospital. William Marsden’s wife, Elizabeth Ann, passed away from cancer and it was his way of studying and researching the disease while offering palliative care. In 1954 the hospital was renamed The Royal Marsden Hospital. Today, the hospital is the largest cancer centre in Europe and known internationally as a place for groundbreaking cancer research and treatment.

bromton, london